Coco and the Angle of Incidence

Coco in Thought

Coco in Thought

Regal Coco

Regal Coco

When photographing Coco, my sister’s dog, over Thanksgiving I played with the angle of incidence – the angle of the light coming into my lens.  If you compare the two images above you’ll notice that when I was above Coco the light was not entering my lens in a direct way, therefore the light was not hazy, and she was not as blown out.  When shooting from below Coco, the angle allowed for more flare or haze as the light came directly into the lens.  This is a perfect example of how photographers should move around, above, or below, their subjects in order to capture the subject in the most pleasing light.   The most pleasing light may be softer, more blown-out light with haze and/or flare, or it may be more direct light allowing for details of the subject to be more definitive.

An easy way to experiment with the angle of incidence is to place a subject such as a vase of flowers in front of a window or door and shoot at different angles.  Once you upload the files, compare the way the light hit your subject based on the angle of the light coming into your lens.

The light being used for the photographs of Coco was hard, direct, and warm light.  The character of the light being used will also influence the final lighting of your subject, but the angle of the light entering your lens is what will result in the differences you see above.

Have fun experimenting and if you would like to share your images with me you can tag me in your post, or send me the link to your post!

Monochromia today…

I would like to invite all my followers to visit Monochromia today to see my most recent post.  I post to Monochromia, a black and white photography blog, every Thursday.  For those of you who enjoy black and white photography I encourage you to follow Monochromia. I think you will find the blog inspiring and will not be disappointed.

 

Mystery of Love

mystery of love

mystery of love

mystery of love in black and white

mystery of love in black and white

“Love leads us into mystery where no one can say what comes next, or how, or why.”
– Caryn Mirriam-Goldberg
The pink rose, depending on the color being dark or light, represents thankfulness, grace and joy in the Victorian Language of Flowers.  In words, the quote above does not correlate directly to the meaning of the pink rose, however, in my heart, I am thankful for the love I’ve experienced and the mystery of what it will bring in the future.
How about you?  Are you thankful for the love you’ve experienced? Do you find yourself wondering about the how and why and what might happen next?
With love, and all emotions, we as humans tend to rush into the future wondering and hoping for the next phase or the next event.  Instead of being mindful of the present moment and savoring the joy of it, we overwhelm ourselves with anticipation and perhaps fear.  This fact can often lead to shortcomings in relationships, a loss of joy, much anxiety, and overall hopelessness instead of the peace of love and an abundance of smiles.
It’s imperative to stop, cherish the moment, be mindful of the love in our lives, and just let life be.  This is not a simple task, but with patience and perseverance, we can all accomplish mindfulness and experience the joy of true love.
 Details for the image above: SS 1/60 f3.5  ISO 2000
Which do you prefer – color, or black and white?

A Moment in Time…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the garden.

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“I grow plants for many reasons: to please my eye or to please my soul, to challenge the elements or to challenge my patience, for novelty or for nostalgia, but mostly for the joy in seeing them grow.” – David Hobson

Personality, Eyes, and Skin…

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I loved working with this family a couple of weeks ago… A mom and her three girls!  Is there anything more beautiful than a woman with the loves of her life in their natural state?   I’m thinking Dad/Husband will be thrilled with his surprise gift!  What do you think?

A House, in Black and White

“I never expected anyone to take care of me, but in my wildest dreams and juvenile yearnings, I wanted the house with the picket fence from June Allyson movies. I knew that was yearning like one yearns to fly.” – Maya Angelou

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ss 1/250  f 14 ISO 400

A Newborn Session

I recently did a newborn photo session with a baby that weighed over 11 pounds at birth.  She was so precious.  Below you’ll find a few images from the shoot.  In addition to sharing photographs of the baby, I thought it might be useful to present a few tips on newborn photography.

1.  Get to know baby.  Hold baby, cuddle with baby and help the baby get comfortable with you.  If you are anxious or nervous the baby will sense this.

2. Posing – To achieve the frog-like poses  you often see, the baby should be between 5 and 10 days old.  I like to wait until they are at least 5 days old so that the mother and baby have had time to bond and Mom is settled into the new routine of having a newborn.  By about day five the baby too has acclimated to his/her new surroundings, although do not expect them to be on a schedule or predictable with their feeding/changing patterns.  As you can see in my images I forewent the frog pose in this shoot.  Even though the baby was only 8 days old, she was very big and not as “moldable/posable” as a smaller more flexible baby would have been.  This is not a problem, you can still get a lot of cute poses and use props to capture the baby’s essence.  Remember, you don’t have to use the scrunched up poses to capture the beauty of the baby.  You can easily pose their hands and get completely different looks and moods within your images. Also, don’t forget to focus on babies unique features – fingers, toes, nose, ears, head – each one makes the baby unique and the parents will love having these precious little pieces of the love of their lives captured permanently.  Also, remember that the baby doesn’t necessarily need to be moved and reposed all the time – you move; side to side, up and down, back and forth.  It’s a work out but you’ll capture every inch of the little bundle of joy!

3.  Time – Newborn shoots should take from 2 to 4 hours.  As happened during this particular shoot, the baby needed to be fed twice and took a bit of time to settle after the first feeding.  She also had to go potty several times and when babies are naked, you know what means! –  My kids always think it is funny when I come home from a newborn shoot and tell them that the baby went to the bathroom on me.  Needless to say, you don’t want to wear your Sunday best for a newborn shoot.  And, be prepared with extra wraps and blankets to use in the event some are soiled during the shoot.

4.   Flexibility – is crucial.  I don’t mean the ability to be acrobatic, but to be patient and go with the flow of baby and baby’s needs. This is why you want to allow several hours for the shoot.  You won’t be able to go from one pose to the next with prompt acuity.   I like to have Mom stay near by too, just in case baby needs something or  just to be another set of eyes in the event the baby decides to squirm.

5.  Fragility – Newborns are fragile.  Be very careful with them.  Yes, they are moldable and posable, but they are also very delicate.  Handle them gently and with great care.

6.  Do your homework – There are plenty of Youtube videos out there on photographing newborns.  Prior to attempting a newborn shoot, I recommend that you study newborn photography and watch some of the videos linked below.

Links:

The Natural Newborn – Daneille Stahl and Carrie Walker

Newborn Wrapping Technique – Kelly Brown

Ana Brandt – I love all of her videos!

Of course there are more tutorials available, but I wanted to give you a start.  If you go to Youtube and watch any of the videos I listed above, other recommendations will pop up on the right side of your screen.

Let me know if you have any questions and I’ll try to help.  Enjoy the photos below of this little hunk of love!


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2104 Point Shoe Series – VI

2014 Pointe Shoe Series VI

2014 Pointe Shoe Series VI

“Everything in the universe has rhythm. Everything dances.” -Maya Angelou

Find your rhythm and dance this weekend everyone!

A Recent Newborn Shoot

Newborn Shoot

 

ss 1/60 f 5.0 ISO 1000

manual settings and focus, natural light

 

Newborn Shoot

 

ss 1/60 f5.0 ISO 1000

manual settings and focus, natural light

Newborn Shoot

 

ss 1/60 f5.0 ISO 1000

manual settings and focus, natural light

Newborn Shoot

 

ss 1/60 f5.6 ISO 1000

manual settings and focus, natural light

Newborn Shoot

 

ss 1/60 f5.0 ISO 1000

manual settings and focus, natural light

All of the newborn images above were shot using my Nikon D800 and my 50mm 1.4 lens. Individual settings are above.  Which is your favorite?

 

“A new baby is like the beginning of all things-wonder, hope, a dream of possibilities.”
– Eda J. Le Shan

2014 Pointe Shoe Series – V

2014 Point Shoe Series V

2014 Point Shoe Series V

ss 1/60  f4.5  ISO 1250

Manual focus, manual settings, diffused light, black and white conversion in Topaz Labs

“When life takes me on a new journey, I simply remember the smile my first ballet recital put on my face and I move forward.” – Andrea Thompson